L.L. Diamond

News, Blog, and Stories

Have you ever heard of the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue? Captain Francis Grose wandered the dockyards and slums of London during the late night hours collecting slang words he compiled into a book that is as much a history reference as it is an amusing romp through the myriad of ways to call someone stupid or a whore. According to a BBC article on the subject, Grose loved anything rude, so if the word had any sexual connotation, it would be included. I’ve occasionally looked for fun words in Grose’s work, though usually for Colonel Fitzwilliam. I think he would’ve heard more of these words during his forays with the Regulars than Darcy would at White’s.

Today, we have a bit of fun with a Vulgar Vocabulary Lesson. May you use your newfound knowledge wisely 😉

ARSY YARSEY. To fall arsy varsey, i.e. head over heels.

BASTARDLY GULLION. A bastard’s bastard.

PETTICOAT HOLD. One who has an estate during his wife’s life, called the apron−string hold.

CAPTAIN QUEERNABS. A shabby ill−dressed fellow.

DIRTY PUZZLE. A nasty slut

NIGMENOG. A very silly fellow

HORNIFIED. Cuckolded.

LOBCOCK. A large relaxed penis: also a dull inanimate fellow.

Hope you enjoyed today’s Vulgar Vocabulary Lesson! Can you pick out any words from Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue I have in my books? Just curious!

https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20150916-the-vulgar-tongue-a-dictionary-of-filthy-words

4 thoughts on “Vulgar Vocabulary Lesson

  1. Glynis says:

    I’ve definitely heard of a few of them so I must assume I read them in your books?? However with my vast recollections I can’t recall specifics! 🤔😉😳.
    I’m currently rereading Undoing so maybe I will remember to check 😳😳😳.
    I’m impressed with your total dedication to research Leslie 😉🥰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve used a few. Just depends on the situation and who is saying it. Some of the tamer ones might come out of Darcy’s or Bingley’s mouths, but if it’s a bit bawdy, I’ll give it to Col. F. He’s more likely to have heard it in the army by my thinking. It’s kind of fun to just rat around in the online version I’ve found for a fun word 🙂 Thanks, Glynis!

      Like

  2. sheilalmajczan says:

    I have noticed a few in books I read and can usually figure them out from the context…but not always. Thanks for sharing this amusing information.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I will share more in the future. I always get a giggle thumbing through the words. Thanks, Sheila!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: