L.L. Diamond

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Jennifer Joy has answered your questions!

 

I won’t bore you with a long introduction, so let’s get to it.

 

Is your personality more like Elizabeth Bennet, Elinor Dashwood, Anne Elliott, or Jo March?
(J Dawn King)

Jo March. She lived by her imagination even before she began writing and she wasn’t afraid to leave the comfort and security of her family to pursue her dream. I can identify with that.

 

Would you describe yourself as an accomplished woman?
(J Dawn King)

If we’re using Caroline Bingley’s definition of an accomplished woman… not so much.

 

Other than writing, what is the skill you possess that you are proudest of?
(J Dawn King)

I’ve turned into a pretty decent cook. Anyone who has known how much my dear husband has suffered over the years can appreciate what an accomplishment that is!

 

Would you describe yourself as romantic or pragmatic?
(J Dawn King)

A bit of both, really. I believe that romance is shown in the everyday, small details over the course of time. To me, true romance only burns stronger with the passing of the years. So, perhaps I should say that I’m more romantic now (after 13 years of marriage) than I used to be.

 

If you could be on a deserted island with one of Jane Austen’s characters for one year, who would you choose?
(J Dawn King)

Captain Wentworth. A man with his experience at sea could surely build a floating vessel and get us home before the year is up.

 

If you could travel back in time to visit Jane Austen’s house for a two-month stay, what three items would you take with you?
(J Dawn King)

Indoor plumbing, electricity, and deodorant (enough for EVERYONE!).

 

How would you describe the perfect hero?
(J Dawn King)

My perfect hero shows his true colors through his actions, much in the style of Mr. Darcy.

 

Which is your favorite Jane Austen novel and why?
(Debbie Fortin)

It’s no secret that I love Pride & Prejudice! The conflicting personalities and secondary characters make it one of the few stories I’ve read more than once (actually WAY more than once! I’ve lost count…) Sense & Sensibility is a very close second though. I love the contrast between Elinor and Marianne.

 

 

What draws you to Pride and Prejudice?
(J Dawn King)

When I was younger, it was reading about the family dynamics and how sisters acted with each other. As an only child, that fascinated me. Now, I love watching how Darcy and Elizabeth grew as characters to overcome their flaws so that they could have their Happily-Ever-After. It’s a great story on so many levels.

 

Which do you prefer – the book or the movies?
(J Dawn King)

The book. Always the book.

 

Who is your favorite Jane Austen villain and why?
(Debbie Fortin)

Lucy Steele. What she did to Elinor Dashwood was artfully contrived to inflict the most turmoil while manipulating the situation to her favor. And after all that work, she ran off with the richer brother!

 

What made you start writing variations? I Loved pride and prejudice and read it a few times a year and when I found my first variation i was in heaven!! I am so grateful for all the variation authors! And i am now curious what made them write them?
(Miriam)

I saw that I could. That’s what started it. Now, I have to continue because the more I write, the more ideas for stories come to me. Also, like you, I read Pride & Prejudice multiple times a year. I love the world Jane Austen created and writing variations is my way of spending more time in it.

 

How much did your mother’s success push you to write or do you think you would have done this sooner or later even if she didn’t?
(Sheila L.M.)

I don’t know that I would have published if Mom hadn’t done it first. I have always written, but I had no clue that publishing was something that could be done. I’m grateful every day that she started us on this journey!

 

What made you decide to follow in your mom’s footsteps and write P&P stories?
(Dung)

It happened so naturally, I can’t remember actually making the decision! For a time, Mom lived in the apartment above us and we would talk shop quite a lot. Since she wrote P&P stories, I soon had more storylines than I knew what to do with. So, I started writing them down.

 

How much influence has your mother’s being an author had on you? and how much has her encouragement helped you to persevere?
(Debbie Fortin)

It’s wonderful to have someone so important to me who understands the writing process. Because Mom and I know each other so well, trading tips and talking about where we are in our writing, as well as our goals, is invaluable.

 

Do you have a special time of day and place to write?
(Debbie Fortin)

I try to get the bulk of my writing done in the morning— before the kids wake up for school. It’s not my most productive time, but it’s the most peaceful. If I don’t hit my daily word count goal, I’ll make it up while they’re at school. My favorite place to write is at my desk because it’s set up how I like. Earphones… check. Scattered notes and chapter beats… check. My favorite pen and a place for my coffee… check.

 

I admire all you authors, but have no ideas at all for a story so have not desire to write. How so you come up with ideas?
(Sheila L.M.)

You hit the nail on the head with your comment, Sheila. It all starts with the desire to write. I feel restless and out of sorts when I don’t write, so I make it a point to write every day. The more I write (and it can be about anything… from journaling about my kids’ recent antics to daydreaming a long list of What-ifs to working on my current story) the more ideas I get.

 

How did you come up with the inspiration for this story? I love the pig scene!
(Dung)

I wanted to include a mystery element, so that’s what got the story going. It needed to be something that would keep Darcy in Hunsford as well as something that could potentially keep him and Elizabeth apart. When I sketch out a novel, I keep in mind the main turning points or changes that will affect the characters and write with that goal in mind. The pig was a happy surprise that fit what the characters needed at that point in their story. It was so ridiculous— and we know how much Elizabeth loves to laugh at the ridiculous 😀

 

Do you have any favourite mystery series / fictional detectives which might have inspired the course of action (as opposed to the plot itself).
(My Yellow Kitchen)

I’m a big fan of Agatha Christie. Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple, Tommy and Tuppence… I love them all.

 

When you hit a block, what do you do to get yourself back on track: sing, read, clean, bake, etc?
(Debbie Fortin)

My husband is an amazing soundboard. The only blocks I experience are completely self-imposed. Sometimes I complicate things unnecessarily. I’ll tell him where I’m at in the story and where I’m trying to go with it and he can pinpoint the issue in a sentence. Or just talking about it out loud works the kinks out. He’s amazing!

 

Which of Miss Austen’s characters is most difficult for you to write, and why, and which is the easiest?
(Natalie R)

Would it shock you to know that it’s Elizabeth Bennet? It is! At the beginning of her story, she’s snarky and judgmental. While I love her sass, it’s difficult for me to write her because I’m more of a Jane (peace-loving and allergic to conflict). The easiest for me thus far has been Anne de Bourgh. So little is said about her that the possibilities are endless.

 

How difficult is it to keep the Spanish influence out of your Regency dialogue?
(J Dawn King)

Oh my goodness, it’s difficult! The only English I get most days are from my 7-year-old twins (who cross between Spanish and English in a single sentence) and my husband (who speaks English as a second language). It’s one of the things that encouraged me to write and keeps me reading the classics— I don’t want to lose my English!

 

As the Chief Inspector of the Grammar Police, what is your biggest pet peeve when you read a story with errors in it?
(J Dawn King)

I understand how difficult the editing/proofreading process is. No matter how much I try and no matter how many mistakes my proofers catch, there will always be a few that slip by. What I dislike is when there are so many mistakes that I end up focusing on them instead of the story. At that point, I’m no longer enjoying the story as a reader, but I’m critiquing as an editor. I’d rather just read!

 

Why are you so hard on your mother when you proofread her stories?
(J Dawn King)

For the same reason I would never allow you run around town with broccoli stuck in your teeth.

 

What has been your most valuable lesson learned since publishing your first book?
(J Dawn King)

Just keep writing. One book’s success does not mean every book will do equally great. Nor does one book’s failure mean that the next can’t be wonderful. So long as I write stories in a way which entertains me (By re-write #5, believe me, this is VERY important!) then I can’t lose.

 

You seem to be leaning towards cozy mysteries with your latest stories. Do you plan to continue the mystery theme?
(J Dawn King)

I may not have a robbery or a murder in every story, but I am fascinated with hooks and intrigues. Saving some answers for the climax of the story is fun!

  

Jennifer, I loved your Cousins trilogy so I was wondering if you would consider writing a sequel for it? I loved how you developed Anne and would love to know how you envisage her in married life with Luc? Thank you for the chance to win your newest book!
(Carole in Canada)

Anne is very special to me too, Carole. So special that while I would love to move on to other stories, I can’t bring myself to say that I’m done with her story completely. I have some ideas that are percolating…

 

Any upcoming projects you’re working on?
(Dung)

I’m almost finished with the first draft of my next novel. Right now it’s titled Book 6 because I can never think of a title until my husband insists that he needs it for the cover. All I can say for now is that Mr. Bingley’s aunt is a hoot and Caroline Bingley cannot hold her liquor.

 

If you could have a cup of coffee with anyone who has died in the past 250 years, who would it be?
(J Dawn King)

I know that I should say, ‘Jane Austen’ and I would LOVE to chat with her. She would either tell me off for using her characters as I have or she would get a kick out of them! But in reality, I would love to share a cup of coffee with my great grandpa King. I wasn’t old enough to drink coffee when he passed away and he lived such an interesting life, I’d love to talk to him again.

 

 

 

Thank you, Jennifer, for such fun answers and
agreeing to be our guest this month!

Now, as a late Valentines day gift,
Jennifer has four e-books of 

Accusing Elizabeth

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to give away!

Yes, you saw that correctly, we’ll have four winners, so comment so you can enter to win!

The giveaway is open internationally!

Rules for the giveaway – 

If you asked a question, you already have 1 chance in the drawing.

If you comment on the final interview, you get 1 chance in the drawing.

If you left a question and comment, you get 2 chances in the drawing!

Please join in! Authors love answering your questions and hearing from you! 

Last day for comments for the giveaway is
Wednesday 17 February.

27 thoughts on “Jennifer Joy’s interview is in!

  1. Glynis says:

    What a lovely interview. I think the rapport between mother and daughter is wonderful. I am so pleased that there are many many P&P variations of which I have a large number including some from both Jennifer and her mum. Many thanks for the chance of a giveaway as I am looking forward to reading this book 📚😊

    Like

    1. Michelle Hall says:

      What a really lovely interview and your mother had lots of questions! I agree with Glynis, I would be so lost without all your wonderful JAFF writers keeping the world of Jane Austen, Regency and Darcy and Elizabeth alive. I just love picking up a book and escaping into this world.

      Thank you for the giveaway.

      Like

      1. Jennifer Joy says:

        😀 She keeps me on my toes, Michelle! Like you, I love it that there are so many wonderful variations out there. It seems that the more of them I read, the more of them I WANT to read! Best wishes in the giveaway!

        Like

    2. Jennifer Joy says:

      Thank you, Glynis! Mom and I have always been friends and it’s been so much fun sharing our writing experiences with each other.

      Like

  2. Christina Boyd says:

    Great interview and interview questions!

    Like

    1. Jennifer Joy says:

      Thank you, Christina! It’s fun to be given an opportunity for writers and readers to mingle in their mutual admiration for all things Jane Austen 🙂

      Like

  3. Anji says:

    Hi Leslie and Jennifer. Sorry I didn’t get around to asking any questions on the previous post but your Mum has done a pretty good job in asking them for me. Anything I could come up with, she’s beat me to it!

    Please don’t enter me for the draw as I already have a copy. I promise there’s a review coming very soon, Jennifer, probably later this week, work and kitchen refit permitting. All of the winners have a treat in store for them.

    Jennifer, it sounds as if your relationship with your Mum is very similar to the one I had with mine. Sadly she passed away in 1999 and though we were also separated by the miles, our bond remained close almost until the end, when strokes and a coma took her away.

    Good lick to everyone!

    Like

    1. Anji says:

      P.S I meant to add that I love the way you’ve brought Anne out of the shadows in your stories. And of course, I was wishing everyone ‘good LUCK’ in my first comment. I should know better when it comes to proofreading before hitting ‘post’.

      Like

      1. Jennifer Joy says:

        And here I was thinking I should add a lollipop with each book 😀 Thank you so much for your kind comments, Anji! Your support and encouragement are priceless to me. I’m so happy you were fortunate enough to be close to your mom too. It’s a special relationship and one I hope to enjoy with my daughter. Hugs!

        Like

      2. Anji says:

        *Chuckles*.

        It’s always a pleasure to be able to help both you and your Mum.

        Like

  4. Dung says:

    Wonderful interview. Thanks for answering them.

    I loved your comment about the three things you would bring for a two-month stay…lol “deodorant”

    Can’t wait to hear more about your upcoming project. You have me curious with that teaser.

    Love your relationship with your mom as well!

    Like

    1. Jennifer Joy says:

      Yeah, personal hygiene has improved vastly since then! Thank you for taking the time to ask some great questions, Dung.

      Like

  5. Jennifer Redlarczyk says:

    Another great interview. I love reading about our authors. Thanks, gals. Jen Red

    Like

    1. Jennifer Joy says:

      Thank you, Jen! Isn’t it fun to type your own name? 😀

      Like

  6. Jennifer, I wasn’t surprised you picked Captain Wentworth. I was surprised that you didn’t envision a Swiss Family Robinson scenario with him building you a marvelous treehouse. Wouldn’t the twins love something like that? I would. (Remember how many times the three of us watched that movie? I still think it’s one of Dad’s favorites.)

    Like

    1. Jennifer Joy says:

      Now, that would be fun! Jonah would swing from tree to tree pretending to be a monkey, but Bekah is afraid of heights, so that puts paid to that.

      Like

  7. Carole in Canada says:

    What great questions and wonderful answers. It is great getting to you know and for putting yourself out there! Your mother/daughter relationship is wonderful! Your mom is a special person as are you! I am all anticipation regarding your answer to my question! Thank you and Leslie!

    Like

    1. Jennifer Joy says:

      Ha, me too, Carole! I have some sparkly ideas mulling around in my mind. When they grow so numerous they won’t leave me alone, then I’ll feel that I have a story worthy of a sequel. It’s such a fun process! Thank you for loving Anne as much as I do.

      Like

  8. Natalie R. says:

    Thank you for the fun interview! I find it easiest to write the minor characters, too, and for the same reason. 🙂

    Like

    1. Jennifer Joy says:

      I’m glad to see I’m in good company!

      Like

  9. Lizzybel says:

    You need not include me for the give away for I have already purchased and read the book–which I enjoyed as usual. However, I wanted to let you know that I thoroughly enjoyed the interview. It is always interesting to gain a greater understanding of a fellow author.

    Like

    1. Jennifer Joy says:

      Thank you, Lizzybel! This interview was particularly fun to do.

      Like

  10. Fawn George says:

    Love Swiss Family Robinson. Wanted a Tree House Like that. Agree to the JO March. Love you both.

    Like

    1. Jennifer Joy says:

      There are so many great stories to read! I liked the movie, The Swiss Family Robinsons, but the book was amazing! I think we could all survive on an island with it as a guide. Love you too, Fawn!

      Like

  11. suzanlauder says:

    Great questions and great answers! I know Joy appreciates your help in her writing, Jennifer. It’s strange how we feel like something is missing if we’re not engaged in what’s happening with our Darcy and Elizabeth today!

    Like

    1. Jennifer Joy says:

      Now, isn’t that true! Darcy and Elizabeth are like relatives at this point— the fun ones that we can’t stop talking/writing about!

      Like

  12. Thanks for all of the wonderful comments! The giveaway is closed, but please feel free to comment if you would like. 🙂

    Like

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